FULL FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

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Monday 27th May

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Jared Diamond Crisis and Resilience in an Age of Change, Brexit and Trump.

Monday 27th May | The Mansion House, Dawson St. D2.

Jared Diamond has been called ‘the master storyteller of the human race’. He is professor of geography at UCLA and noted polymath, who speaks 12 languages, and his work has been enormously influential in the fields of anthropology, economics, biology, ornithology, ecology, geography and history. He is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the seminal million-copy-bestseller Guns, Germs, and Steel, one of TIME’s best non-fiction books of all time, and Collapse, a #1 international bestseller. Jared has transformed our understanding of what makes civilizations rise and fall. Now in the third book of this monumental trilogy, Upheaval – how nations cope with crisis and change he reveals how successful nations recover from crisis. Given what is happening with Brexit, this could not be more timely. Jared will show us how countries as diverse as Japan, Chile, Indonesia and Germany have survived major upheavals through a process of self-appraisal and adaptation similar to the ways in which individuals learn to cope with personal trauma. Looking ahead to the future, he will voice his concerns about the potential shift of the United States away from democracy. The lessons of history and the tools of self-knowledge, he will argue, can be applied to any nation at any point to avert catastrophe before it actually strikes. Exhibiting the awe-inspiring grasp of history, geography, economics and anthropology that marks all Diamond’s work, and given that so many countries are on the cusp of massive political change, this discussion will be unmissable. Join us and learn from one of the world’s greatest intellectuals how both nations and individuals can become more resilient in our troubled times. Venue: The Mansion House, Dawson Street, D2
Tickets from: €20

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Thursday 13th June

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When Britain Breaks Up

Thurs 13th June | Secret Garden

Is the British project, kicked off 400 odd years ago by Henry 8th, over? It spanned the globe at its height but is now a deeply divided entity, undermined – perhaps fatally – by English nationalism. In the next decade, as a result of Brexit, it is highly likely that Britain will break up. Will it go the way of Yugoslavia in violence or the way of Czechoslovakia in a velvet divorce? Will London, like Madrid with the Catalans, arrest Scottish separatists? And of course, what happens with Northern Ireland, 100 years old next year? We open the festival with this critical issue because, ultimately, the future of Britain is the future of Ireland. With Bill Emmott, Pinchas Landau, David McWilliams and Jennifer O’Connell.
Price: €15

Understanding Russia

Thurs 13th June | Secret Garden

This year is the twentieth anniversary of Putin coming to power in Russia. While America and its President have become a laughing stock, Putin has reinvented Russia. It is taken seriously. He inherited a bankrupt, collapsing country, and in 20 years he has made it into a superpower again. Geo-politically – from Syria to Venezuela – all roads lead to Moscow. But what about Russia itself? How much do we know about it, do we understand it and ultimately what does Russia want? As Putin bestrides the globe, as possibly the only true statesman left, don’t miss this deep dive in one of the world’s least understood countries. With Zhanna O’Clery, Pinchas Landau, Gerry McCarthy, Gary Shteyngart and Bill Emmott. This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin.

Price: €20

Disordered Minds: How Dangerous Personalities are Destroying Democracies

Thurs 13th June | Secret Garden

Ian Hughes’ remarkable new book offers a compelling and timely account of the dangers posed by narcissistic leaders, and provides a stark warning that the conditions in which this psychopathy flourishes – extremes of social inequality and a culture of hyper-individualism – are the hallmarks of our present age. From Trump to Boris Johnson, Hughes outlines how disordered minds are impacting on your life. Ian Hughes with Gary Jermyn.
Price: €15
4:00 pm –

Inside the Mind of Chinese Millennials

Thurs 13th June | Secret Garden

The most important group in the world will, very soon, be the 300 million Chinese millennials. How do they think? How do they view the West and what future do they imagine for China, imminently the world’s biggest economy? If you want to understand young people in China today, this is for you. Karoline Kan’s new book “Under Red Skies” traces her extraordinary life from a dirt poor village in rural China in 1989 to writing for the New York Times today. It’s an engrossing account of a rapidly changing China seen through the eyes of an imaginative, ambitious young woman chafing at the constraints of a sexist society and a repressive state. If you want to hear what the future looks like, don’t miss this one off event. Karoline Kan in conversation with David McWilliams.
This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin.
Price: €15

6:00 pm –

Bookers Talk

Thurs 13th June | St. Patrick’s Church

The Personal is Political. Two Man Booker Prize Winners, who also happen to be captivating talkers, reveal how deep personal experience and their world view informs their writing. From climate change to slavery, from homophobia to corruption, from colonialisation to war and brutality, you can expect a light to be shone on the human condition. Marlon James &  Richard Flanagan with Emma Dabiri. Proudly supported by The Doyle Collection
Price: €20

7:30 pm –

Notes to Self: Emilie Pine

Thurs 13th June | Secret Garden

Notes to Self has quite simply reinvented not just Irish, but all autobiographical work. A series of six deeply personal interlocking essays, you won’t want to put it down. Achingly honest, this book is shockingly raw and yet is the most exquisitely precise prose we have read in many years. It has blown the critics away, sold shedloads and established Pine as a truly unique Irish talent. Emilie talks to Keelin Shanley.
Price: €15

7:30 pm –

Making a Murderer

Thurs 13th June | Heritage Centre

Making a Murderer captured the attention of millions of viewers globally. The extraordinary story of convicted murderer Steven Avery and his nephew Brendan Dassey has now taken a new turn with Avery winning his appeal to present new evidence that may overturn the original verdict. Apart from being the specific story of a murderer, an accomplice and a victim, Making a Murderer shone a dramatic light on America, its mass incarceration, its justice system and the people we rarely see, the poor, the forgotten and powerless – the people who end up in prison. Dean Strang, Avery’s lawyer, opens up with Patrick Freyne of The Irish Times.
Proudly supported by The Doyle Collection.
Price: €15

9:00 pm –

Thomas Friedman

Thurs 13th June | St. Patrick’s Church

Thomas Friedman is a three times Pulitzer prize winner whose op-ed columns in The New York Times about economics, foreign affairs, globalization, technology and the environment make him arguably one of the world’s most important columnists and political commentators. Friedman is also winner of the prestigious American National Book Award and his various books on subjects ranging from the Israel/Palestinian conflict, to China, globalisation and the impact of technology on our lives, have all been New York Times’ bestsellers. This is your chance to listen to one of the most influential voices in global journalism here in Dublin. In conversation with David McWilliams.
This event is proudly supported by McCann Fitzgerald
Price: €25

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Friday 14th June

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New Cold War: The Era of Democratic Despots?

Friday 14th June | Seafront Marquee

The US is now in a trade war with China. India and Pakistan are squaring off in Kashmir. In Syria and Yemen a proxy war is being fought between Iran, backed by Russia and China, and Saudi Arabia, backed by America. Meanwhile in Africa, China is out-spending the USA to gain future influence. In Venezuela, the old cold war enemies are lining up against each other. Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, lines are drawn again, East v West once more. What is the next move, and what happens if the new cold war heats up? Could it all boil over? With Ece Temelkuran, Thomas Friedman, Pinchas Landau, Robert Shrimsley and Conor O’Clery.
This event is proudly supported by The Financial Times Weekend.
Price: €15

How to Lose A Country: a few short steps from Democracy to Dictatorship

Friday 14th June | Seafront Marquee

At first it happens slowly, and then very quickly. How do stable countries become unstable? Ece Temelkuran witnessed how democracy in her home country Turkey has become progressively weaker. Her book How To Lose A Country has become an international phenomenon. Join her and the FT’s political editor Robert Shrimsley and the brilliant American writer of the award-winning German series Deutschland 83 and 86, Anna Winger on this global tour of how good countries go bad. With Ece Temelkuran, Robert Shrimsley, Anna Winger and David McWilliams.
This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin.
Price: €15

Dystopia in Paradise: The Dark Side of the Caribbean

Friday 14th June | Secret Garden

White sands, turquoise beaches, pina coladas, herb, reggae and chill, this is the image of the Caribbean that marketers have perfected, but the reality of the Caribbean is far from that ideal. The legacy of slavery, grinding poverty and colonial oppression have framed the Caribbean. Today those same beautiful islands are home to violent gangs, rampant misogyny, mental health issues and widespread homophobia. Claire Adam’s Trinidad and Marlon James’ Jamaica reveal the true story of the Caribbean, the dark side, the uncut side, yet the side that produces great art, great writing and great music. Out of pain great beauty can come, and in this session we will explore both the pain and the beauty. With Marlon James and Claire Adam with Rick O’Shea.
Price: €15

China Unwrapped

Friday 14th June | St. Patrick’s Church

In June 1989, a Chinese man, carrying his shopping, stood in front of a column of People’s Liberation Army tanks in Tiananmen Square, defiant. Tank Man became the symbol of resistance and his action was the culmination of weeks of clashes between the government and pro-democracy protestors. Then the soldiers moved in and within hours it was all over. Thirty years on, China is the world’s coming power, economically, politically and possibly militarily. Democracy has been superseded by wealth and influence and as we face into the third decade of the 21st century, Chinese power seems unstoppable. In this session we unwrap China, tease out what it stands for and speculate what will happen when China overtakes America. Will it be peaceful, what can you expect and what will the world look like when China rules the place? With Lenora Chu, Karoline Kan, Francesco Grillo, Pinchas Landau and Michael Vatikiotis.
Price: €20

New Silk Roads: Peter Frankopan

Friday 14th June | Seafront Marquee

Peter Frankopan’s first book The Silk Roads is a masterpiece combining history, politics, economics and the finest storytelling, to create a magic evocation of the ancient silk roads from Istanbul to Shanghai. Now with the unveiling of China’s Belt and Road Initiative, Beijing aims to recreate the Silk Roads with the world’s biggest infrastructure plan to link China with Europe, India and Russia via rail and road networks. This plan will tilt the world’s economic axis back to the ancient Silk Roads with profound ramifications for all of us. Peter Frankopan is one of the most sought-after thinkers in the world and we are delighted that he has chosen to come to Dalkey to share his insights. This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin. Peter Frankopan in conversation with David McWilliams.
Price: €15

Who’s Afraid of a United Ireland?

Friday 14th June | St. Patrick’s Church

The most significant long-term ramification of Brexit will be a United Ireland. Demographics point to a catholic/nationalist majority in the next decade, while the majority in the North want to stay in Europe. Middle ground Unionism, seeing the writing on the wall, may now vouch to remain in Europe, via a New Ireland. The vast majority of citizens of the Republic want it to happen, but at what cost? Would loyalism fight, can we afford it and who wants to risk peace and prosperity in the Republic for the fourth green field? This may be the most important session in the festival because there is so much at stake and yet so little specific discussion on this existential topic. So, who’s afraid of it? With Diarmaid Ferriter, Martina Devlin, Eoin McNamee and Andrea Catherwood.
Price: €20

Movies and Books

Friday 14th June | Seafront Marquee

This is a must for film buffs, TV aficionados, and book lovers. Join a ten-time Academy Award winner, a Booker prize winner, the brilliant creator of recent TV sensation Deutschland 83 and 86 and a double-Oscar winning producer as they explore books, movies and the future of TV. With David Puttman, Anna Winger, Marlon James, Lana Citron and Ed Guiney.
Proudly supported by The Doyle Collection
Price: €20

Why History Matters

Friday 14th June | Secret Garden

This year it was announced that history would be removed from our school Junior Cert curriculum as a compulsory subject. For many this is a travesty, for others it is the march of progress and part of an essential shift towards science, maths and technology. But what about the expression “those who don’t know their history are condemned to repeat it”? Two of the finest historians of their generation, Diarmaid Ferriter and Peter Frankopan jump to the defence of history and explain why history matters. Peter Frankopan and Diarmaid Ferriter with Theo Dorgan.
Price: €15

Northern Noir

Friday 14th June | The Heritage Centre

F**k Brexit! There is something far more compelling going on up the road. The success of Anna Burns’ Milkman has again, and not before time, focussed attention of the burgeoning brilliance of new Northern Irish literature. What’s going on up around Belfast, where is all the talent coming from and what else will be achieved by Northern writers in the years ahead? With Jan Carson, Eoin McNamee and Wendy Erskine.
Price: €15

The Surprising Power of Ideas that Don’t Make Sense: Rory Sutherland

Friday 14th June | St. Patrick’s Church

Why is Red Bull so popular- even with the taste? Why do we prefer stripy toothpaste? How did a fast food outlet double its sales by putting up prices? Discover the answers with the legendary advertising guru Rory Sutherland who returns to Dalkey with his first book Alchemy:the surprising power of ideas that don’t make sense. This TED talk superstar (over 6.5million views) had the audience in stitches when he was here three years ago. Sutherland blends cutting edge behavioural science with stand up performance to explain how humans are innately illogical and how we can tap into our irrational selves to drive brands, products and businesses to global success. Tickets were like hen’s teeth last time Rory came to the festival. Pick up yours early to avoid disappointment!
Price: €20

Young, Woke & Socialist? Are Young People Lurching to the Left?

Friday 14th June | Secret Garden

100 years after Lenin predicted the World Revolution at the 1919 inaugural meeting of the Communist International, could his prophesy become true, albeit a century late? All over the world, the young are swinging to the Left. In the US, the home of tooth and claw capitalism, Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez is leading the charge, and dragging the Democratic Party towards a more traditionally socialist agenda. In Berlin, German youth are protesting on the streets over higher rents while over in the UK, if the last election had only the under 25’s vote been considered, no Conservative candidate would have won a seat. Are we on the cusp of something huge? With Emma Dabiri, Molly Parsons, Emmett Kirwan and Carlo Pizzati.
Price: €15

Ninety years of Faber & Faber

Friday 14th June | The Vico

As the grandson of Faber’s founder, Toby Faber grew up steeped in the company’s books and its stories. Hear the author read from unpublished archive material, including diaries, letters and memos, in an intimate and entertaining history of one of the world’s greatest leading houses. This is a rare insight into the lives and minds of the twentieth century’s greatest writers, as Faber’s most infamous rejection and acquisition stories are explored, and we celebrate the lasting impact of literary superstars from Sylvia Plath to William Golding. Uncover the secrets behind Faber’s history and learn how a tiny firm survived war and financial crashes to remain independent to this day. Full of stories and personal insight, this talk also traces Faber’s history through its illustrations, covers and designs. It will feature artists from Rex Whistler and Barnett Freedman to Peter Blake and Damien Hirst and design concepts from the typographical excellence pioneered by Berthold Wolpe to the various ‘grids’ used by the agency Pentagram. Join us for a tour of Faber’s rich cultural heritage – from the origins of the company and the arrival of T. S. Eliot to the discovery of Lord of the Flies and on to the present day.
Price: €15

Countess Markievicz: Flamboyant aristocrat or committed revolutionary?

Friday 14th June | The Heritage Centre

This most complicated and unusual revolutionary has captured the imagination of Irish historians for decades. But who actually was she? How did the girl presented to Queen Victoria as a debutante, become one of the leading players in the 1916 rising? She was the first Irish female minister, Minister for Labour in the first Sinn Fein government in 1919. As we look back at the War of Independence let’s take time to explore this extraordinary woman, Countess Markievicz. With Martina Devlin and Andrea Catherwood.
Price: €10

Artificial Intelligence

Friday 14th June | St. Patrick’s Church

What happens when our computers get smarter than we are? We are in the process of building superhuman machines, terrifyingly intelligent robots. If we just keep going, we will continue to improve these intelligent machines, and we will eventually build general intelligence into our machines. We will build machines that are much, much smarter than us. How do we control them? Or maybe more crucially at this stage does anybody have any idea what the relationship between humans and robots is going to be in the very near future? With Luke O’Neil, Pilita Clark, Carlo Pizzati and Robert Shrimsley.
This event is proudly supported by The Financial Times Weekend.
Price: €20

Paul Howard: Never Mind the Bullochs!

Friday 14th June | Seafront Marquee

Paul Howard is best known as the creator of Ross O’Carroll-Kelly, a fictional rugby jock whose exploits have been the subject of seventeen novels, which have sold more than one million copies in Ireland alone. He has been described by The Irish Times as Ireland’s “pre-eminent satirist” and by the Irish Independent as “one of the world’s funniest writers”.
This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin.
Price: €20

My Magnetic North: Gary Coyle

Friday 14th June | The Vico

Gary Coyle is an Irish artist whose work embraces various media including drawing, photography and spoken word performance. “My Magnetic North”, is the final part of a spoken word trilogy with images which explores his hometown of Dun Laoghaire. This show recently sold out 5 nights in Dublin’s Project Arts Centre so if you missed it, here is a chance to catch it in Dalkey. And if you were lucky enough to get a ticket to his show at The Project, you’ll most likely want to see it again.
Price: €15

Joanne McNally: Gleebag

Friday 14th June | Secret Garden

Fresh from a sold out Vicar Street gig, we are delighted to have local hero (well, Killiney actually) and Ireland’s (self-titled) comedy sweetheart, Joanne McNally in Dalkey. Joanne is feeling powerful and she hopes Vogue Williams & Amy Huberman are sh*tting themselves because she’s coming for their emerald crowns and if she can’t take them fairly, she will joust them right off their immaculately groomed heads.
Price: €15

Edible Pleasures: Lana Citron

Friday 14th June | The Vico

Calling all “discerning gourmands”, “connoisseurs of seduction” and “gastronomes of love”, author Lana Citron will be talking desire, passion and the pursuit of oral gratification to celebrate her latest publication Edible Pleasures, a textbook of aphrodisiacs. Lana looks at the culture and history of aphrodisiacs in a talk which will be informative, entertaining, stomach-churning (the more gross examples) and, hopefully, palate-whetting.
Price: €15

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Saturday 15th June

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John Brennan in conversation

Saturday 15th June | Seafront Marquee

John Brennan, retired head of the CIA, is the man Donald Trump loves to hate – so he must be doing something right! This is a unique chance to understand how America works from deep inside the system. How does the CIA operate? What does it know? From the hunt for Osama Bin Laden to the highly public showdown with Trump, Brennan has been at the epicentre of American politics and intrigue for years. This conversation will shed light on how America really works and offer an insider’s view on the true machinations not just from the centre of the Empire but also a first-hand account of the Trump White House.
Price: €20

So, You Want to Open a Coffee Shop?

Saturday 15th June | Secret Garden

Colin Harmon built 3fe – Ireland’s hippest coffee brand – from a one-man coffee cart in a nightclub lobby to the internationally renowned business it is today. The lessons, stories and guidelines in his richly illustrated book offer a unique and honest insight into the day-to-day realities of what many people see as their dream job. If great coffee and a bit of personal liberation is your thang, join us for coffee. Colin Harmon with Orna Mulcahy.
Price: €15

Matchstick Men

Saturday 15th June | The Heritage Centre

Julia Kelly is the author of With My Lazy Eye, which was nominated for Book of the Decade by the Irish Book Awards, and The Playground. She lives in Dalkey. Her latest book, Matchstick Man, is an unbearably honest, unsentimental and heartbreaking personal account of a brilliant man’s mental disintegration and its effects on his family. It is an unforgettable telling of a story that will be familiar to many thousands of people who live with someone who has Alzheimer’s. Julia Kelly will be in conversation with neuroscientist Ian Robertson.
Price: €10

It Must Be My Hormones

Saturday 15th June | The Masonic Lodge

The best-selling author of BRINGING UP BÉBÉ investigates life in her forties, and wonders whether her mind will ever catch up with her face. When Pamela Druckerman, an American in Paris, turns 40, waiters start calling her “Madame,” and she detects a disturbing new message in men’s gazes: I would sleep with her, but only if doing so required no effort whatsoever. Yet forty isn’t even technically middle-aged anymore. And after a lifetime of being clueless, Druckerman can finally grasp the subtext of conversations, maintain (somewhat) healthy relationships and spot narcissists before they ruin her life. What are the modern forties, and what do we know once we reach them? What makes someone a “grown-up” anyway? And why didn’t anyone warn us that we’d get cellulite on our arms? Part frank memoir, part hilarious investigation of daily life, There Are No Grown-Ups diagnoses the in-between decade. Pamela Druckerman with Jennifer O’Connell.
Price: €15

How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are

Saturday 15th June | The Town Hall

What makes you the way you are and what makes each of us different from everyone else? In Innate, leading neuroscientist and popular science blogger Kevin Mitchell traces human diversity and individual differences to their deepest level: in the wiring of our brains. Variations in the way our brains develop before birth strongly influence our psychology and behaviour throughout our lives, shaping our personality, intelligence, sexuality, and even the way we perceive the world. We all share a genetic program for making a human brain, and the program for making a brain like yours is specifically encoded in your DNA. But the way that program plays out is affected by random processes of development that manifest uniquely in each person, even identical twins. The combination of these developmental and genetic variations creates innate differences in how our brains are wired, differences that impact all aspects of our psychology. Kevin Mitchell transforms the way we see the interplay of nature and nurture. He also explores the genetic and neural underpinnings of disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and epilepsy, and how our understanding of these conditions is being revolutionized, the social and ethical implications of these ideas and of new technologies that may soon offer the means to predict or manipulate human traits. Innate will change the way you think about why and how we are who we are. Kevin Mitchell with Ian Robertson.
Price: €15

The Book Reviewers

Saturday 15th June | The Heritage Centre

Madeleine Keane, Literary editor of the Sunday Independent and Fred Studemann, Literary editor of The Financial Times talk to Patrick Freyne about the value, purpose and effectiveness of the book review. What makes a good review? Is book reviewing a public service or an art? Why in Ireland will publishers tell you that non-fiction books tend to get it in the neck while fiction works tend to be more gently handled? Can envy blind the reviewer? In a small country, is there a danger that a group of “luvvies” will inflate a friend’s work and denigrate someone who’s not “in the gang”. And in a world of Amazon, Good Reads and Twitter where readers can give their own opinions, is the self-appointed reviewer a dying species? Do reviewers actually read the books they review or only the first and last chapters? Do book reviewers sometimes use the review to show how they are more erudite than the author whose work they are reviewing? Can a review make or break a book? And how much power do the reviewers really have?
This event is proudly supported by The Financial Times Weekend.
Price: €10

Beyond #MeToo

Saturday 15th June | Seafront Marquee

Is this the most significant protest movement in the history of humanity? Or is there a danger the pendulum has swung too far in the tricky, thorny and impossible to regulate area of sex, power and gender? Will there be a backlash? Could we be descending into a culture of victimhood and the infantilising of women? From talk to action, what are we hoping for in the years ahead? What next for the #MeToo movement? Emma Dabiri, Aoife McLysaght, Lenora Chu, Tishani Doshi and Jennifer O’Connell
Price: €20

The Secret Life of a Hedge Fund God and More Tales!

Saturday 15th June | Secret Garden

Gary Shteyngart’s latest novel Lake Success has been nominated “best book of the year” by the New York Times, New Yorker, Washington Post and the Guardian, building on the outrageous success of Aburdistan. Gary, born in Leningrad, is also winner of the Wodehouse Prize for comic literature. We are delighted to have such a talent here with us at Dalkey. His latest book Lake Success is a real gem: a brilliant and hilarious insight into the slightly warped minds of the Masters of the Universe, who control Wall Street’s hedge funds (and Ireland’s vulture funds). If you want a funny but also deadly serious take on what is going on inside the heads of those who run the world, from New York to Moscow, this is the gig for you. There’ll be lot more too from one of America’s most celebrated writing talents. Gary Shteyngart with David McWilliams.
Price: €15

Class Matters: Lynn Ruane talks to Emmet Kirwan

Saturday 15th June | The Town Hall

Lynn Ruane’s “People like Me” just won Irish non-fiction book of the year. Publishing a memoir at 34 years old seems a bit early in life, especially Irish life. But then Lynn is a woman before her time, experiencing a series of shocking incidents in her personal life at a young age, lead Lynn to alcohol and drug use by the age of 13, and a young mother at 15. A force of nature from the day she was born, Lynn Ruane grew up in a loving home in Tallaght, West Dublin. But in her early teens things began to unravel, and she fell into a life of petty crime and chaotic drug use. Lynn will be talking to Emmet Kirwan, writer of the remarkable “Dublin Oldskool”. Let’s be open, let’s be honest and get to the heart of why class matters.
Price: €10

The Art of Storytelling

Saturday 15th June | The Heritage Centre

This event has changed venue from St. Patrick’s Church to The Heritage Centre.
We all love a great story, not just for the joy it brings, but from the memories it leaves behind and the emotions it triggers in all of us. But what makes a story great? What makes someone a good storyteller? Storytelling is something we all do naturally, starting at a young age, but there’s a difference between good storytelling and great storytelling. What is it? Come listen to four brilliant storytellers as they explain the art of storytelling. Deborah Levy, Richard Flanagan and Tishani Doshi, chaired by Rick O’Shea.
Price: €20

Voices in My Head: Exploring Schizophrenia

Saturday 15th June | The Masonic Lodge

In The Heartland, the follow up to his Costa novel of the year Shock of the Fall, Nathan Filer, a former mental health nurse, invites us to spend time in the company of some extraordinary people whose lives have been affected by this most strange of human conditions, and to discover their complex, surprising, painful, funny and ultimately relatable stories. Interlacing these first-person encounters with a series of meditative essays, he debunks myths, challenges orthodoxy and offers fresh insight into what is traditionally considered to be psychiatry’s heartland: the diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia. Just as The Shock of the Fall did, The Heartland will illuminate our perception and transform lives. Nathan Filer will be in conversation with Kevin Mitchell, associate Professor of Genetics and Neuroscience at Trinity College Dublin.
Price: €15

Brexit and Us

Saturday 15th June | Seafront Marquee

We can’t think of a better panel to discuss the critical Issue of “Brexit and us” and by “us”, we mean, Ireland and Britain. Already, Brexit has poisoned relations between Britain and Ireland, inflamed old divisions in Northern Ireland, made the border between the two sides of the country a flash point again, and has underlined how little English people know about Ireland. But is it all bad? Are there any upsides and what will it do, long term, to the relationship between Ireland and Britain? Join our brilliant panel for this crucial discussion. James O’Brien, Chris Patten, Pippa Malmgren, Fintan O’Toole and David McWilliams, chaired by PJ Gallagher.
Price: €20

Trump’s America: Four more years?

Saturday 15th June | Seafront Marquee

For the media he is the gift that keeps giving, for others he is an American hero and for many more he is a terrifying narcissist in the most powerful position in the world. Later this year he will be on the campaign trail. Can he win and if he does what will become of America? Even if he loses, what will Trump’s legacy be in the world’s stand out superpower? We have brought you an all American panel to Dalkey to discuss just that. John Brennan, Anna Winger, Pamela Drukerman and Pippa Malmgren, chaired by PJ Gallagher.
Price: €20

Shaw’s Arias

Saturday 15th June | Secret Garden

Long before he won the Nobel Prize for Literature (1925) and an Academy Award for the screenplay for Pygmalion (1938), George Bernard Shaw worked as a music critic in London. Soprano Síobhra Quinlan and pianist Annalisa Monticelli draw on the music criticisms of George Bernard Shaw, performing works contextualised by his writings on music. The whole show will be chaired by the redoubtable Fintan O’Toole whose brilliant book Judging Shaw was described as ‘a handsome tribute from one of Ireland’s leading intellectuals to one of his mightiest forebears’ by Terry Eagleton, London Review of Books. This is a lovely show, revealing one of the great Shaw’s less celebrated sides.
Price: €20

Kashmir: The Most Dangerous Place in The World?

Saturday 15th June | The Town Hall

Think of the country, divided by two religions, partitioned in the first half of the 20th century by an arbitrary border drawn by departing Englishmen after centuries of colonialization. The larger part was agricultural, the smaller part more urban. The border has been a constant source of conflict and due to an election in one country, in recent months it has again become an international flashpoint. No we are not talking about Ireland but India and Pakistan. Both are ruled by religious adherents one Hindu one Muslim, both countries are nuclear-armed and Kashmir could again flare up, leaving the region vulnerable to yet another conflict except this time, the whole world allied to either could be dragged in. With Nelofer Pazira, Carlo Pizzati, James Crabtree and Michal Vatikiotis.
Price: €20

Marlon James: Black Leopard, Red Wolf – An African Game of Thrones

Saturday 15th June | St. Patrick’s Church

We are delighted to have Man Booker Prize winner Marlon James back in Dalkey to unveil his latest work Black Leopard, Red Wolf. The critics are raving about it. The Washington Post said that “James has spun an African fantasy as vibrant, complex and haunting as any western mythology and nobody who survives reading this book will ever forget it”; the notoriously sniffy Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times declared that “with Tracker and the Leopard, James has created two compelling and iconic characters, characters who will take their place in the pantheon of memorable and fantastical superheroes”. But why take their word for it? Come and hear the man himself talking to Emma Dabiri.
Price: €20

Creepy Victorians

Saturday 15th June | Masonic Lodge

You think they are prudish, straight laced and dull, but they were anything but. Come to this wonderful, quirky event exploring the violence, depravity and deviancy of the era which is widely misunderstood. Sex, drugs and no self-control, come and listen to the untold story of your ancestors. With Paraic O’Donnell, Dean Ruxton and Nuala O’Connor.
Proudly Supported by The Irish Times.
Price: €15

From Good to Great: How To Make a Brilliant 21st Century Education System

Saturday 15th June | Seafront Marquee

In a world where information is limitless, where memory is being made redundant by Google, where the jobs of the future are not even invented yet, education and the ability to analyze, discern and make a relevant contribution is more important than ever. But how do we create an education system that gets the best out of every person, giving everyone a chance? If teaching is something someone else does to you and learning is what you do for yourself, what are we to make of our current education system? Education is crucial, but despite all our learning, how much do we actually think about it? Technology is changing work, knowledge and every aspect of our lives, yet the education system has barely changed in two generations. Oscar-winner and educationalist, David Puttnam and Chinese/American journalist and author of Little Soldiers (a best-selling book comparing the Chinese and American schooling system),Lenora Chu tease out the major issues and paint a 21st century portrait of what the best education system could look like with Francesco Grillo and Alec Russell.
This event is proudly supported by The Financial Times Weekend.
Price: €20

Humanology – What it Means to be Human

Saturday 15th June | Secret Garden

Luke O Neill’s wonderful best-seller Humanology explains almost every aspect of what makes us human: how, when, where, and who, with some speculation as to why. For all his easy wit and clever pop-culture references, Luke is fundamentally a serious scientist with an amazing knack of making science accessible and this discussion with fellow scientist Aoife McLysaght will move from pre-creation to our eventual extinction, along the way taking in the laughter, gender assignments, love, God, diet, disease, 10cc, population control and lots in between. If you are curious about us, this bizarre animal called the human being, this is a show for you.
Price: €15

India, Upside Down: The Billionaire Raj and the Mapillai

Saturday 15th June | The Town Hall

Money, sex, avarice and Bollywood, today’s India is a far cry from the country of Mahatma Gandhi. It is an economic and political powerhouse, nuclear armed and ready to take on the world. It will soon be the most populous country on earth, overtaking China and at the very top of the food chain is a billionaire class – the Bollygarchs – whose ambitions and decadence are truly extraordinary. Although rarely mentioned, Ireland’s richest man is Indian, one of an Indian oligarch class whose influence and power extends throughout the globe. This session will lift the lid on the little understood Indian Billionaire class. Joining James Crabtree, author of The Billionaire Raj is Carlo Pizzati whose recent fantastic book Mappillai meaning ‘son-in-law’ in Tamil, is Carlo’s story, a European journalist living with his in-laws in urban Chennai and with his wife in rural Tamil Nadu. Carlo’s story is also one of extremes, of fascination and suspicion and his awkward attempts at cruising through a maze of bribery, bureaucracy and traffic. But, beyond this, Mappillai is the story of India, offering an intimate capsule of contemporary Indian history, of the associated Hinduization and Westernization of India, intertwined with the Indianization of a European! If you are interested in understanding the world’s largest democracy and soon-to-be most populous nation, don’t miss this gig with two brilliant journalists.
Price: €15

Constellations: Sinead Gleeson, Deborah Levy & Lisa Hannigan

Saturday 15th June | St. Patrick’s Church

“I have come to think of all the metal in my body as artificial stars, glistening beneath the skin, a constellation of old and new metal. A map, a tracing of connections and a guide to looking at things from different angles.” In these powerful and daring essays Sinéad Gleeson delves into a range of subjects: art, illness, ghosts, grief and our very ways of seeing. Sinéad is joined by singer songwriter Lisa Hannigan and one of our favourite novelists, the great Deborah Levy.
Price: €20

It’s Ann Devine Time! Colm O’Regan with Tara Flynn

Saturday 15th June | The Masonic Lodge

Everybody knows an Ann Devine, a riddle, wrapped up in a fleece, inside a Skoda Octavia. In his laugh-out-loud funny first novel, Ann Devine, Ready For Her Close-Up, Colm O’Regan, stand up and author, affectionately satirises rural Ireland. Prepare for belly laughs with the author of the Irish Mammies series. A ray of sunshine and an antidote perhaps to the gloominess that abounds. In conversation with comedian and author, Tara Flynn.
Price: €15

Macron: the most important man in Europe?

Saturday 15th June | St. Patrick’s Church

From the gilets jaunes to their dapper President’s stance of Europe, from wine and couture, to art, literature and cinema, not to mention football, France is a world leader. This extraordinary country is stylish, self-confident, dogged and unbowed, and critically France presents a different way of living, thinking and creating. It is a counterbalance on almost every level in language, philosophy, food and of course, sex. Sophie Pedder of the Economist, is an exile moored in this great country and is the author of Revolution Francaise, the seminal account of Emmanuel Macron’s rise from independent outsider to President. Just how ambitious is Macron? And will he really change France? Let’s take a look at France versus the world, its mysteries, its attractiveness and ultimately the French vision. In a Europe without Britain, France will only become stronger, more influential and ultimately the “French way” will have a much greater influence on Irish life. With Sophie Pedder, Simon Kuper and Hugh Linehan.
Price: €20

The Object of Language and the Language of Objects – SOLD OUT

Saturday 15th June | Seafront Marquee

Actor, comedian, raconteur, and author, Stephen Fry shares his wit and wisdom with Jony Ive, the man who, by designing three of the most iconic products of our age – the iPod, iPad, and iPhone- has changed your world probably more than any other single living human being. Truly a one-off event featuring treasured polymath, Stephen Fry, and Apple design guru, Jony Ive. Two global superstars mark the tenth anniversary of the festival by sharing one stage at Dalkey!
Proudly Supported by FT Weekend.
Price: €30

How to Be Right: James O’Brien

Saturday 15th June | Seafront Marquee

Fast becoming the leading spokesperson for liberal Britain, LBC radio presenter James O’ Brien has been a beacon of rationality in a world gone mad. In fact his best seller is called “How to be right – in a world gone mad” and it’s a wonderful guide to talking to people with faulty ideas. Every day on radio, O’Brien and his millions of listeners, hear people blaming the ills of the world on immigrants, welfare scroungers, Brussels and feminists. And every day, he dismantles their arguments with humour, insight and vast knowledge. This gig is for you, if you want to puncture fake news, half-baked notions and makey-uppey opinions – and crucially, have a laugh doing so. Don’t miss Britain’s number one media star, teasing out how to make sense of the madness of our world, with David McWilliams.
This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin.
Price: €20

Kevin Barry: Night Boat To Tangiers

Saturday 15th June | St. Patrick’s Church

Kevin Barry is one of Ireland’s true literary geniuses. His work defies category, but is the product of a most extraordinary imagination and for festival goers there’s the huge advantage that Kevin is, without doubt, the most compelling performer and reader of his own work. Many writers try to replicate the words, when reading their own work. It is extremely difficult to do, but when Kevin takes to the stage, you are transfixed. Its mesmerising. We are delighted to have Kevin back at Dalkey for our 10th anniversary as he was here on our inaugural year, so having him back here is special for us. He is the author of the novel City of Bohane and two short story collections, Dark Lies the Island and There Are Little Kingdoms. He was awarded the Rooney Prize in 2007 and won The Sunday Times EFG Short Story Prize in 2012. For City of Bohane he was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award and the Irish Book Award, and won the Authors’ Club First Novel Prize, The European Prize for Literature and the IMPAC Prize. Kevin has an original screenplay, The Gee Gees, in development with Element with David Kerr attached to direct. Another screenplay, based on stories from Dark Lies the Island and There Are Little Kingdoms, is in development with Michael Garland at Grand Pictures. Kevin’s second novel Beatlebone was published in 2015 and won the Goldsmith’s Prize 2015. His third novel, Night Boat To Tangiers is just out. We can’t wait.
Price: €15

The World in 2025

Saturday 15th June | St. Patrick’s Church

2025 is not that far off. Six years in fact. Now think about the changes that have happened in the past six years? Back then Donald Trump was an estate agent and reality TV star, frequently bankrupt, with a weakness for wives. Brexit was a glint in the eye of radical English nationalists. ISIS had never been mentioned, Crimea was part of Ukraine and both Uber and Airbnb were fringe apps, hoping to survive. A border poll was never even spoken about. Imagine the changes that are likely to be coming down the tracks in the next six years. The world is changing at such a pace, it’s hard to pin point the areas of your life that will be convulsed. But fear not: our panel will try to plot a future course and trace out the potential changes ahead, to give us all a sense of what the world will look like, geo-politically, economically and socially in the year 2025. With Thomas Friedman, Simon Kuper, Ece Temelkuran, Pilita Clark and Robert Shrimsley.
This event is proudly supported by The Financial Times Weekend.
Price: €20
 

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Sunday 16th June

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Love, Sex, Death and the search for truth in Iran

Sunday 16th June | Finnegan’s

You think Iran is all about Burkhas, mullahs and virgins? Well think again. Tehran is a bustling city of nose-jobs, boob-jobs and various other jobs! Come to hear about the real Iran, up close, uncovered and really quite startling. Ramita Navai’s City of Lies won the debut political book of the year and was awarded the Royal Society of Literature’s Jerwood Prize for non-fiction. Simon Sebag Montefiore described it as “gripping, a dark delicious unveiling of the secret decadent life of Islamic Tehran, deeply researched yet exciting as a novel ”. A rare chance to hear award-winning Iranian journalist, Ramita Navai, who won an Emmy for her PBS documentary Syria Undercover, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for Iraq Uncovered, was nominated for two Emmys for Dispatches, while ISIS and the Battle for Iraq won the British Journalism Award for Foreign Affairs and the Frontline Club Broadcast Journalism Award. Ramita Navai in conversation with Joanne McNally.
Price: €15

Fake news: Democracy Hacked?

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

What is the role of trust in the modern media landscape? Should politicians be more accountable for fake news? Is the world becoming a better place or is fear replacing fact? Why do we no longer trust facts and experts? How has feeling/ emotions reshaped our world? Join this international panel to tease out some of these issues. With Mark Little, Sophie Pedder, James O’Brien, Suki Kim and Alec Russell.
This event is proudly supported by The Financial Times Weekend.
Price: €15

How to write a TV Blockbuster – like Deutschland ’83

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

We are delighted to have the creator of the internationally successful German blockbuster Deutschland ‘83 and its follow up ‘86 (and soon to be aired ‘89), Anna Winger in Dalkey. The series are produced by her husband Joerg Winger and the cold war TV drama has received rave reviews, with bloggers praising its fashion and soundtrack. It is the highest-rating subtitled drama in television history. Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Germany portrayed in Deutschland 83, set in the very unfashionable East Berlin of 1983, is a completely compelling if terrifying place. The regime is mendacious and without pity while the West was run by trigger-happy American generals, whose main aim was to eliminate the Soviet threat. Into this cauldron is dropped the innocent Martin Rauch, recruited as a spy and the adventure begins. We loved it. It’s the biggest German cultural export since Kraftwerk and the question is how did they do it? How did Anna create a script and make a German TV series so successful abroad? How do you take a script and make it into perfect television, shown in dozens of countries? And how do you do this working with your spouse and not divorce? In conversation with David McWilliams.
Price: €15

The Shoemaker and His Daughter: Conor O’Clery & Zhanna O’Clery

Sunday 16th June | The Heritage Centre

When countries collapse, people suffer. 30 years ago, the Soviet Union began to fall asunder and although much of the coverage was about the big geopolitical event, the impact on real people’s lives was both devastating and inspirational. Come and listen to this extraordinary, harrowing but life-affirming account of what happened to ordinary people when everything they believed in collapsed around their ears.
Price: €10

Creativity – where does it come from?

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

If creativity is the mental capacity to generate new and interesting ideas, where does it come from? For the artists, is it a eureka moment of inspiration or the culminating of year of work, honing the craft until ultimately something unique emerges. Is it age related? Do we go through a purple patch like some musicians or do we keep producing creative work into old age, like Picasso? Join an Oscar winner, a Booker Prize Winner, a Goldsmiths Prize award winner and a New York Times bestseller as we explore this intriguing question, where does creativity come from. With Richard Flanagan, Lenora Chu, David Puttnam and James Ryan.
Price: €20

Bloomsday Special: The Jewish Novel

Sunday 16th June | St. Patrick’s Church

James Joyce, the ultimate modernist, made Ireland’s most famous literary character, Leopold Bloom, Jewish, thus making Ireland’s most famous novel, if not a Jewish novel, one with at the very least a distinctly Dublin Jewish flavour. Is there such a thing as the Jewish novel? The Jewish diaspora have carved out a unique identity for themselves over the centuries, which has allowed for the creation of some truly unique voices, narratives, humour and chutzpah. Join our wonderful panel on this special day Bloomsday, celebrating Ireland’s most famous Jew, Mr Bloom, for an illuminating and engaging discussion on what constitutes the Jewish novel. With Gary Shteyngart, Deborah Levy, Lana Citron, Pamela Druckerman and Zuleika Rodgers.
Price: €20

The Geography of Thought

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

Globalization suggests that we humans are all internationalists, who think similarly and are only cosmetically affected by geography. But is this true? How does geography influence thought and ideas? Do people from different cultures think differently? How much of “home” is there in great art and great creativity? Is there a distinct European, Asia, American, African, or Antipodean world view? And, on a more profound level, do the children of Aristotle think differently to the descendants of Confucius? With Ece Temelkuran, Richard Flanagan, Lana Citron and Suki Kim.
Price: €15

Mind on Fire

Sunday 16th June | The Masonic Lodge

A beautifully written, devastatingly intense account of madness – and recovery, to the point where he has not had any serious illness for over a decade and has become an acclaimed playwright. Fanning conveys the consciousness of a person living with mania, psychosis and severe depression with a startling precision and intimacy. Mind on Fire is the gripping, sometimes harrowing, and ultimately uplifting testament of a person who has visited hellish regions of the mind. But the book is more than that: it is also the story of being a writer, and a narrative weaving its way through the book is the story of how he as a writer negotiated a creative career while suffering from a serious mental illness. What does it means to be creative and to live with a diagnosis of a serious mental illness. How, if at all, do these two elements interact? And can being diligent in maintaining mental health allow creativity to flourish? Arnold Thomas Fanning with Jennifer O’Connell.
Price: €10

Joseph O’Connor: Shadowplay

Sunday 16th June | The Town Hall

Local hero, bestselling author, creator of The Star of the Sea and one of Ireland’s greatest storytellers, has a new novel out this June. Shadowplay explores Bram Stoker’s intense relationships with the actors Henry Irving and Ellen Terry, while working together at the Lyceum Theatre, relationships that inspired the creation of Dracula. This magnificent novel examines the complexities of the type of love which stands dangerously outside social convention, the restlessness of creativity, and the experiences that led to Dracula, the most iconic supernatural tale of all time. In conversation with Roisin Ingle.
Proudly Supported by The Irish Times
Price: €15

Surveillance Capitalism: Is Big Tech Big Brother?

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

Surveillance capitalism is all about trawling everything you do online, every time your phone beeps, every time you update your calendar, every time you search, you are being watched. Then your data is re-packaged into predictions about what you are about to do next and sold to people who want to sell you something! This is the next form of capitalism posing the question, who owns you? Who owns your experiences and who is watching you right now and what are the implications for your privacy, your life and our democracy? With Lenora Chu, Simon Kuper, Mark Little and Suki Kim.
This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin.
Price: €20

Don’t Touch My Hair: Emma Dabiri

Sunday 16th June | St. Patrick’s Church

Straightened. Stigmatised. ‘Tamed’. Celebrated. Erased. Managed. Appropriated. Forever misunderstood. Black hair is never ‘just hair’. The scope of black hairstyling ranges from pop culture to cosmology, from prehistoric times to the (afro)futuristic. Uncovering sophisticated indigenous mathematical systems in black hairstyles, alongside styles that served as secret intelligence networks leading enslaved Africans to freedom, Don’t Touch My Hair proves that far from being only hair, black hairstyling culture can be understood as an allegory for black oppression and, ultimately, liberation. Emma Dabiri is an Irish-Nigerian academic, writer and broadcaster. She is a teaching fellow in the Africa department at School of Oriental and African Studies in London. Her first book Don’t Touch My Hair is published by Penguin. Her hair has been disappointing people since birth. In conversation with Sorcha Pollak.
Price: €15

Robert Fisk in Conversation

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

Robert Fisk has lived in the Arab world for more than 40 years, covering Lebanon, five Israeli invasions, the Iran-Iraq war, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Algerian civil war, Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait, the Bosnian and Kosovo wars, the American invasion and occupation of Iraq and the 2011 Arab revolutions. Occasionally describing himself as an ‘Ottoman correspondent’ because of the huge area he covers, Fisk joined The Independent in 1989. He has written best-selling books on the Middle East, including Pity the Nation and The Great War for Civilisation. Join him as he reflects on his career and what he has learned about reporting, the Middle East and humanity. In conversation with Bill Emmott.
Price: €20
 

Elif Shafak: 10 minutes, 38 seconds

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

The Irish Times has called best-selling novelist Elif Shafak ‘the most exciting Turkish novelist to reach western readers in years.’ We are delighted to welcome back this mesmerising speaker who received a standing ovation when last at Dalkey Book Festival, enchanting those lucky enough to get a ticket to see her. Best known for The Forty Rules of Love and The Bastard of Istanbul, Shafak’s writing blends East and West, feminism and tradition, the local and the global, Sufism and rationalism, creating one of today’s most unique voices in literature. Her latest novel, 10 Minutes, follows Leila, a sex worker in Istanbul during those 10 minutes after she is murdered and her body dumped in a bin, exploring her thoughts as her brain shuts down. For Leila, each minute after her death brings a sensuous memory: the taste of spiced goat stew, sacrificed by her father to celebrate the long-awaited birth of a son; the sight of bubbling vats of lemon and sugar which the women use to wax their legs while the men attend mosque; the scent of cardamom coffee that Leila shares with a handsome student in the brothel where she works. Each memory, too, recalls the friends she made at each key moment in her life – friends who are now desperately trying to find her, not knowing it’s already too late. Elif Shafak will be in conversation with Roisin Ingle of The Irish Times.
Price: €15

David O’Doherty: You Have to Laugh

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

Unhook your mindbras. David O’Doherty is back at the Dalkey Book Festival with a brand-new show made up of talking and songs played on a crappy keyboard from 1986. As seen on BBC2’s Live At The Apollo and Channel 4’s 8 Out Of 10 Cats Does Countdown. David will have just landed back from a tour of this show in Australia; let’s hope the keyboard survived.
Price: €20