SUNDAY'S EVENTS

16 June 2019

 

Love, Sex, Death and the search for truth in Iran

Sunday 16th June | Finnegan’s

You think Iran is all about Burkhas, mullahs and virgins? Well think again. Tehran is a bustling city of nose-jobs, boob-jobs and various other jobs! Come to hear about the real Iran, up close, uncovered and really quite startling. Ramita Navai’s City of Lies won the debut political book of the year and was awarded the Royal Society of Literature’s Jerwood Prize for non-fiction. Simon Sebag Montefiore described it as “gripping, a dark delicious unveiling of the secret decadent life of Islamic Tehran, deeply researched yet exciting as a novel ”. A rare chance to hear award-winning Iranian journalist, Ramita Navai, who won an Emmy for her PBS documentary Syria Undercover, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for Iraq Uncovered, was nominated for two Emmys for Dispatches, while ISIS and the Battle for Iraq won the British Journalism Award for Foreign Affairs and the Frontline Club Broadcast Journalism Award. Ramita Navai in conversation with Joanne McNally.
Price: €15

Fake news: Democracy Hacked?

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

What is the role of trust in the modern media landscape? Should politicians be more accountable for fake news? Is the world becoming a better place or is fear replacing fact? Why do we no longer trust facts and experts? How has feeling/ emotions reshaped our world? Join this international panel to tease out some of these issues. With Mark Little, Sophie Pedder, James O’Brien, Suki Kim and Alec Russell.
This event is proudly supported by The Financial Times Weekend.
Price: €15

How to write a TV Blockbuster – like Deutschland ’83

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

We are delighted to have the creator of the internationally successful German blockbuster Deutschland ‘83 and its follow up ‘86 (and soon to be aired ‘89), Anna Winger in Dalkey. The series are produced by her husband Joerg Winger and the cold war TV drama has received rave reviews, with bloggers praising its fashion and soundtrack. It is the highest-rating subtitled drama in television history. Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Germany portrayed in Deutschland 83, set in the very unfashionable East Berlin of 1983, is a completely compelling if terrifying place. The regime is mendacious and without pity while the West was run by trigger-happy American generals, whose main aim was to eliminate the Soviet threat. Into this cauldron is dropped the innocent Martin Rauch, recruited as a spy and the adventure begins. We loved it. It’s the biggest German cultural export since Kraftwerk and the question is how did they do it? How did Anna create a script and make a German TV series so successful abroad? How do you take a script and make it into perfect television, shown in dozens of countries? And how do you do this working with your spouse and not divorce? In conversation with David McWilliams.
Price: €15

The Shoemaker and His Daughter: Conor O’Clery & Zhanna O’Clery

Sunday 16th June | The Heritage Centre

When countries collapse, people suffer. 30 years ago, the Soviet Union began to fall asunder and although much of the coverage was about the big geopolitical event, the impact on real people’s lives was both devastating and inspirational. Come and listen to this extraordinary, harrowing but life-affirming account of what happened to ordinary people when everything they believed in collapsed around their ears.
Price: €10

Creativity – where does it come from?

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

If creativity is the mental capacity to generate new and interesting ideas, where does it come from? For the artists, is it a eureka moment of inspiration or the culminating of year of work, honing the craft until ultimately something unique emerges. Is it age related? Do we go through a purple patch like some musicians or do we keep producing creative work into old age, like Picasso? Join an Oscar winner, a Booker Prize Winner, a Goldsmiths Prize award winner and a New York Times bestseller as we explore this intriguing question, where does creativity come from. With Richard Flanagan, Lenora Chu, David Puttnam and James Ryan.
Price: €20

Bloomsday Special: The Jewish Novel

Sunday 16th June | St. Patrick’s Church

James Joyce, the ultimate modernist, made Ireland’s most famous literary character, Leopold Bloom, Jewish, thus making Ireland’s most famous novel, if not a Jewish novel, one with at the very least a distinctly Dublin Jewish flavour. Is there such a thing as the Jewish novel? The Jewish diaspora have carved out a unique identity for themselves over the centuries, which has allowed for the creation of some truly unique voices, narratives, humour and chutzpah. Join our wonderful panel on this special day Bloomsday, celebrating Ireland’s most famous Jew, Mr Bloom, for an illuminating and engaging discussion on what constitutes the Jewish novel. With Gary Shteyngart, Deborah Levy, Lana Citron, Pamela Druckerman and Zuleika Rodgers.
Price: €20

The Geography of Thought

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

Globalization suggests that we humans are all internationalists, who think similarly and are only cosmetically affected by geography. But is this true? How does geography influence thought and ideas? Do people from different cultures think differently? How much of “home” is there in great art and great creativity? Is there a distinct European, Asia, American, African, or Antipodean world view? And, on a more profound level, do the children of Aristotle think differently to the descendants of Confucius? With Ece Temelkuran, Richard Flanagan, Lana Citron and Suki Kim.
Price: €15

Mind on Fire

Sunday 16th June | The Masonic Lodge

A beautifully written, devastatingly intense account of madness – and recovery, to the point where he has not had any serious illness for over a decade and has become an acclaimed playwright. Fanning conveys the consciousness of a person living with mania, psychosis and severe depression with a startling precision and intimacy. Mind on Fire is the gripping, sometimes harrowing, and ultimately uplifting testament of a person who has visited hellish regions of the mind. But the book is more than that: it is also the story of being a writer, and a narrative weaving its way through the book is the story of how he as a writer negotiated a creative career while suffering from a serious mental illness. What does it means to be creative and to live with a diagnosis of a serious mental illness. How, if at all, do these two elements interact? And can being diligent in maintaining mental health allow creativity to flourish? Arnold Thomas Fanning with Jennifer O’Connell.
Price: €10

Joseph O’Connor: Shadowplay

Sunday 16th June | The Town Hall

Local hero, bestselling author, creator of The Star of the Sea and one of Ireland’s greatest storytellers, has a new novel out this June. Shadowplay explores Bram Stoker’s intense relationships with the actors Henry Irving and Ellen Terry, while working together at the Lyceum Theatre, relationships that inspired the creation of Dracula. This magnificent novel examines the complexities of the type of love which stands dangerously outside social convention, the restlessness of creativity, and the experiences that led to Dracula, the most iconic supernatural tale of all time. In conversation with Roisin Ingle.
Proudly Supported by The Irish Times
Price: €15

Surveillance Capitalism: Is Big Tech Big Brother?

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

Surveillance capitalism is all about trawling everything you do online, every time your phone beeps, every time you update your calendar, every time you search, you are being watched. Then your data is re-packaged into predictions about what you are about to do next and sold to people who want to sell you something! This is the next form of capitalism posing the question, who owns you? Who owns your experiences and who is watching you right now and what are the implications for your privacy, your life and our democracy? With Alec Russell, Mark Little, Jess Kelly and Suki Kim.
This event is proudly supported by Brewin Dolphin.
Price: €20

Don’t Touch My Hair: Emma Dabiri

Sunday 16th June | St. Patrick’s Church

Straightened. Stigmatised. ‘Tamed’. Celebrated. Erased. Managed. Appropriated. Forever misunderstood. Black hair is never ‘just hair’. The scope of black hairstyling ranges from pop culture to cosmology, from prehistoric times to the (afro)futuristic. Uncovering sophisticated indigenous mathematical systems in black hairstyles, alongside styles that served as secret intelligence networks leading enslaved Africans to freedom, Don’t Touch My Hair proves that far from being only hair, black hairstyling culture can be understood as an allegory for black oppression and, ultimately, liberation. Emma Dabiri is an Irish-Nigerian academic, writer and broadcaster. She is a teaching fellow in the Africa department at School of Oriental and African Studies in London. Her first book Don’t Touch My Hair is published by Penguin. Her hair has been disappointing people since birth. In conversation with Sorcha Pollak.
Price: €15

Robert Fisk in Conversation

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

Robert Fisk has lived in the Arab world for more than 40 years, covering Lebanon, five Israeli invasions, the Iran-Iraq war, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Algerian civil war, Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait, the Bosnian and Kosovo wars, the American invasion and occupation of Iraq and the 2011 Arab revolutions. Occasionally describing himself as an ‘Ottoman correspondent’ because of the huge area he covers, Fisk joined The Independent in 1989. He has written best-selling books on the Middle East, including Pity the Nation and The Great War for Civilisation. Join him as he reflects on his career and what he has learned about reporting, the Middle East and humanity. In conversation with Bill Emmott.
Price: €20
 

Elif Shafak: 10 minutes, 38 seconds

Sunday 16th June | Secret Garden

The Irish Times has called best-selling novelist Elif Shafak ‘the most exciting Turkish novelist to reach western readers in years.’ We are delighted to welcome back this mesmerising speaker who received a standing ovation when last at Dalkey Book Festival, enchanting those lucky enough to get a ticket to see her. Best known for The Forty Rules of Love and The Bastard of Istanbul, Shafak’s writing blends East and West, feminism and tradition, the local and the global, Sufism and rationalism, creating one of today’s most unique voices in literature. Her latest novel, 10 Minutes, follows Leila, a sex worker in Istanbul during those 10 minutes after she is murdered and her body dumped in a bin, exploring her thoughts as her brain shuts down. For Leila, each minute after her death brings a sensuous memory: the taste of spiced goat stew, sacrificed by her father to celebrate the long-awaited birth of a son; the sight of bubbling vats of lemon and sugar which the women use to wax their legs while the men attend mosque; the scent of cardamom coffee that Leila shares with a handsome student in the brothel where she works. Each memory, too, recalls the friends she made at each key moment in her life – friends who are now desperately trying to find her, not knowing it’s already too late. Elif Shafak will be in conversation with Roisin Ingle of The Irish Times.
Price: €15

David O’Doherty: You Have to Laugh

Sunday 16th June | Seafront Marquee

Unhook your mindbras. David O’Doherty is back at the Dalkey Book Festival with a brand-new show made up of talking and songs played on a crappy keyboard from 1986. As seen on BBC2’s Live At The Apollo and Channel 4’s 8 Out Of 10 Cats Does Countdown. David will have just landed back from a tour of this show in Australia; let’s hope the keyboard survived.
Price: €20